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Indian tiger
Protecting India’s tigers is an enormous job: most of the tiger population, which in 2018 stood at almost 3,000, live in one of the 51 tiger reserves, covering almost 74,000 square kilometres.

Just estimating the total tiger population is a daunting task.
To carry out its most recent survey, India’s National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) deployed camera traps in 26,838 locations, taking 34,858,623 images of wildlife.
On top of that, researchers covered hundreds of thousands of kilometres on foot, looking for signs of tigers and their prey.
To wade through all that data the NTCA used artificial intelligence (AI), which had been trained to recognise different animals.
In the 2018 survey, AI helped by identifying which animals were pictured by the camera traps – a task which would have been very laborious for humans.
Now the NTCA hopes to take the use of AI to another level. A new system is being developed which can give rangers the best routes for patrolling the vast areas under their watch.

Source: BBC Technology News

Date: September 7th, 2022

Link: https://www.bbc.com/news/business-61824904

Discussion

  1. Artificial intelligence (AI), which had been trained to recognise different animals is called Machine Learning. How is the “machine” (AI) trained?
  2. The article talks about ” A new system is being developed which can give rangers the best routes for patrolling the vast areas under their watch. ” It does this by using ” an artificial intelligence which can use the data collected by cameras and rangers, but in addition uses data gathered from satellites and information collected from the local population.” How might this AI work?

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