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The Bank of Nova Scotia building is shown in the financial district in Toronto on Tuesday, August 22, 2017. Canadians eyeing internships, co-op placements and graduate positions at Scotiabank no longer have to polish up their resumes.

Canadians eyeing internships, co-op placements and graduate positions at Scotiabank no longer have to polish up their resumés.

The Toronto bank removed the requirement as part of its campus hiring program and has begun using assessments from Waterloo, Ont. technology company Plum to help find untapped talent and ease the barriers to employment among some population groups.

“We are taking away any bias, which would be where did someone go to school, what jobs did they have before and what opportunities did they have or not have based on their upbringing or circumstances?” said James Spearing, Scotiabank’s vice-president of talent acquisition.

“(We’re) removing as much of that possible and giving a level playing field.”

Source: Toronto Daily Star

Date: November 26th, 2021

Link: https://www.thestar.com/business/2021/11/21/scotiabank-ditches-resums-for-campus-hiring-widening-candidate-pool.html

Discussion

  1. “Requirements range from the ability to come up with innovative solutions to how someone sets goals, monitors progress and executes projects. Applicants then complete a Plum assessment with problem solving, personality and situational questions targeting those requirements. Applicants receive information on their talents, work style and preferences, while recruiters see a “match score” indicating each candidate’s potential fit with the role they are hiring for and other openings.”
    The article claims that this helps remove bias.
    In what ways might this technology approach actually increase bias?
  2. Does this approach make sense, and if so, why, and if not, why not?

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